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20121201
20121231
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Book TV 20
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CSPAN2 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
in washington d.c. robert caro presents the fourth volume of his biography of lyndon johnson, "the passage of power," the years of lyndon johnson. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. that was such a wonderful introduction. such a wonderful introduction it reminds me what lyndon johnson used to say when he got a nice introduction. he used to say he wished his parents were alive to hear it. he said his father would have loved it and his mother would have believed it. you know, when winston churchill was writing his great biography of his ancestors someone asked him how -- he said i am working on the fifth of a projected four volumes. i am not comparing myself to winston churchill but regard to the lyndon johnson biography we are in the same boat. i have been writing about lyndon johnson so long that people ask me don't you get bored? the answer is the very opposite is true. the one reason i don't think of these books as being about lyndon johnson just as i didn't think of the power brokers being about robert moses, i never had the slightest interest in writing the b
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:45am EST
the military option. shriver opposed this reordering of priorities, generating the observation in washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgove
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
here in the washington, d.c. and works in treasury can attend one of his father's talks. and i didn't even make him buy the book, which -- [laughter] is the key. i'm particularly proud of scott, and just want to say that. and i look around the room, there are some other good friends including my oldest friend and college roommate, it's just really great just to see so many people here. so i've got 30 minutes, 30, 35 minutes. because what i've learned is, and this is difficult to only speak for 35 minutes on a book because, first of all, professors are programmed to talk at 45-minute intervals. i'm not sure i can do anything in 30 minutes, but i really do try because often times the questions are really the best part. and your questions will allow me to either follow up on areas that i maybe didn't cover, or if i don't like the question, i'll just talk about whatever i want. which, you know, the presidential candidates can do it, i am entitled to do that as well. [laughter] so i want to talk to you about what this book is and what this book is not. i want to introduce you, particular
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00am EST
speech, 30s congress convened in washington against tuesday or, abraham lincoln. abraham lincoln hurt clay speech amok and because he was visiting the town on its way from springfield to washington d.c., visiting mary family in lexington and while he was there can be cut to your henry clay's peak. this is a tremendous thing for lincoln. lincoln had idolized clay. he caught is though ideal of a politician and to have the opportunity to hear clay speak must've been a huge thing for him. when lincoln was young, he carried around a book of clay speeches in history than to himself. when he was a young man and the legislature in springfield community president of the clay club and asked him to speak in springfield and clay didn't comes, so this is lincoln's opportunity to to meet the politician he respects and admires the most to be hurt clay gives a speech against the war. so perhaps it isn't surprising that the blanket gets to washington instead of talking about terrorists or economic issues that motivated him as a politician come he decides to oppose the war. the first speech lincoln get
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:15am EST
to write the book. i had a law practice here in washington for many, many years. i did keep notes, and i felt ultimately, um, that i would put it together, and i'd piece it together for a magazine article. and then it expanded, and it became what it is right now. but always behind in my mind i want young people to know, i want young people to know that this ugliness happened. and so it took a while. my brother is a writer up in new york, and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife back into my first year legal research because i had to certify, authorize this was a piece of nonfiction, and you have to put down. i felt with a memoir you could just wig it. well, you can't because once you start highlighting things, you have to get authority for it. you even have to get a concept from people who you put photographs in, the consent of the army, consent of all -- i had a letter from james meredith right after i left which is in the book it, and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, well, you need his permission. i didn't need his
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00am EST
powell of the supreme court. was a lawyer and was planning to do that for my career in washington. was plucked to be general counsel of the parent company of abc back in 81. i did that for a few years. through a roundabout way i ended up becoming president of abc news. it's not something i ever saw to do. even when what to do it i did it because we need secession plant because we needed secession plan and his i thought i would do it for a couple of years. the biggest surprise was that came to absolutely love it. i've met some wonderful jobs. i've been very blessed, but been any news organization like abc news, much less running it is a rare privilege. that's part of the reason i wrote the book is, people have not had that experience, some sense what it is like. >> how do you get to go to the supreme court? what was that process? what did you learn at the supreme court that helped you run abc? >> as i said it went to michigan undergraduate, and sort of wandered into the law. i was fortunate because is a great law school. like the one you have here at university of texas, austin. i
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
one of which in washington is almost been totally discredited because they really haven't included a broad swath of the opposition, broad enough that would have legitimacy with the opposition back in syria itself. but there are some attempts and people are thinking about these things-perhaps because of what happened in iraq in 2003. >> wonderful. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 8:00pm EST
's ecowas write the book. i have a lot practiced in washington for many years. i felt ultimately that i would put it together and piece it together. a magazine article and it expanded and it became what it is right now. always in my mind, i want young people to know. i want young people to know the this happened and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 10:30am EST
-1950, and he had a quotation from george washington hanging in a frame behind his desk. it's an obscure quote from a letter george washington wrote to his officers who at the time were getting applications from other people to be officers. and the quote says: do not suffer your good nature to say yes when you ought to say no. remember that it is a public and not a private cause that will be injured or benefited by your choice. that quote worked it way into paul volcker's brain, and he's been saying no ever since. [laughter] paul volcker is known today for the volcker rule, but he earned the trust that easy anonymous with his name and defeating an inflation that almost destroyed the american financial system. why is he obsessed with the financial system? he is fond of blaming his mother just like the rest of us for all of our obsessions. and i say he has to stand in line for -- [inaudible] because she refused to give him an increase in his allowance at the end of world war ii in 1945 when he was leaving to go to princeton to. >> ultimately controlled inflation. the process began. by 1982 infla
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00am EST
. while those back to washington d.c. the testify in court? is just not doable. i think that he is quite right that within the unique concepts -- context of guantanamo bay where we half for a handful of detainees left and have engaged essentially in a war of choice, although with respect to the war on terror, more broadly and obviously we have to fight back against terrorism in some capacity. the underlying nature of the detention authority is not that these people being held for crimes. there being held prevented league as a matter of preventive detention to ensure they don't get back on the field and have an opportunity to kill our soldiers. the question becomes, when you take their reasonableness of the d.c. circuit's handling of the responsibilities of the supreme court with respect to this relatively small population, there's no question, the united states, given all of our wealth of resources can handle habeas cases dealing with a few hundred detainees data guantanamo bay. were up putting more people there because we don't want to have to do with the burdens of doing it but we can
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
eisenhower the granddaughter of the dwight eisenhower at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c.. this is about 50 minutes. .. >> the answer was there is no plan. i blew up, not for the first or last time, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier o
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
eisenhower. he's introduced by susan eisenhower, granddaughter at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> what an honor and treat to be at the eisenhower institute and especially an honor to have susan introduced me. you know, families can be a little touchy about the great man and their family, but the eisenhower's were amazing with me. john, susan, david are completely open, not defensive, which is unusual. incredibly helpful and i could not have done this book without them. so thank you, susan. six weeks after dwight eisenhower became president, stalin died. paik caught together top advisers and officials in that, what's the plan? .. is >> little bit like colonel sanders of kentucky fried chicken. was clearly a figure. ike was rooting for the general, the head of the red army was ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower sent his son john out to do a little spying. john seidel up to him. things are not as they seem. president eisenhower did not find out who was really in charge until the fifth day of the conference, when ik
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
the border playing share if this is where politicians from washington come to talk tough about the border keeping america safe. they don't actually come here with a circle the helicopters and then drive to the ranch areas feeding on the summer in their role county. one day they build taller fence and hire more agents and make it impossible to drive north without going to the border patrol agent check ports with dogs. nothing stops the flow of cubans going north. for years i walked mountains, the mountains and have taken note of your and try to differentiate between the mountain lion skat and the wildcat mines along the trail with a detailed and drilling down the hill. i think of all of the souls that what the mountains at night and the ones that scratched the hole in the mountain hoping to make small fortunes. some did but most did not and most of them died early. all this heavy-metal might be easier to forget if i hadn't heard heard the rumors that they would reopen the mine which would effectively alter the economic and cultural landscape of the town. this makes me realize i have a lot
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:25pm EST
of those discussions talking to johnson both in washington. but when they did start recruiting soldiers, the king made it clear that he supported venture, he did a farewell and sponsored a lot of the celebrations to mark the southps to vietnam. ct personal interest in the wellbeing and h the wounded soldiers in the hospitals when they came back. presided over the funeral them out these sponsored temples so from the jury beginning the king of ved in thiss and supporting it as to say blessing or forward, i don't know, but pretty much like -- i gine without his support such a thing taking place. >> currently what kind of relationship does the u.s. military have with the thai military? >> they still have a close relationship of the royal thai or me. something that haven't changed since the vietnam war month. annual regular exercises with other regional armies. the
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:00pm EST
and why we did it was not based on the speech from washington because it was love of the man next to you. it is a cliche will men jumping out of the trench but that does not keep it from being true. questions like that i focus on the small part that i could do something about. >> the war is as small as it is for you. a general expressing opinion is something we could use more of. but the overall worry is if someone is hiding something, what else are they hiding? how much of anything is ever true? it is on a level of such high discussion that you have to diffuse the bomb and i have to keep 150 marines from being dead. does anyone notice? becomes over detachments of how much of the war is real to those not actively in engaged on the ground. >> i am not a veteran but i see myself as an advocate just because he sits right here. i wanted to read the passage if you keep said general betray as high jinks in mind this is what the first attendant was going through a 1.2 thousand seven. >> up the mountain the first platoon regaining used to a lifestyle even more spartan than the one down the hill.
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 8:00am EST
street journal" and another eight for "the washington post". in the course of this work, he reported on places as varied as somalia, bosnia, iraq and afghanistan, and he's been part of two teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten to know tom over these past few years, eve learned that he's that rarest of finds: a disruptive thinker whose energy and creativity combine in an interesting way. he constantly pushing us to think more nimbly and more provocatively, and that's a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad. he traces the history of george marshall from world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is susan glaser, one of the nation's top national security journalists. susan's the editor-in-chief of fore
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:00pm EST
. for more information, visit salon.com. >> now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stuart eisenstadt. he is also author. ambassador eisenstadt, wiry writing a book about the future of the jewish. >> we survived 3000 years of calamities culminating in a holocaust of her own time and yet we have survived and thrived and continued to societies, even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges and the question is, having survived this terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success and integration. a look at this from two perspectives. i look at the global forces that affect america, american jews and israel, everything for the shift of power from the united states and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization of the digital era about how to deal with the 1.6 million muslims in the world come across to the iranian nuclear power. and i also like an internal press, low birthrates, assimilation and whether we can in effect succeeded at a time that we are more successful than matter and in
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
in the middle of discussions talking both in bangkok and washington. but when they did start recruiting soldiers covered the king made it clear he supported the venture. he bid farewell, sponsored a lot of celebrations that marked the departure of the troops in south vietnam. he showed a direct personal interest in their well-being and visits wounded soldiers in the hospital when they came back. he presided over funeral ceremonies for them at the royal sponsor temple. so from the very beginning, the king of thailand was involved in supporting it. whether it will still go forward i don't know, but pretty much are to imagine such a thing taking place. >> currently but relationship is the u.s. military have? >> be the close relationship with the royal thai army. this is something that hasn't changed since the vietnam war. we have regular annual exercises with other regional armies to help them every year in thailand. many in the united states have contacts with the american counterparts here. so that hasn't changed in the vietnam war. there is a brief souring of thai u.s. relations at the worst con
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)